Before hiring a painter, you should get a detailed estimate from them. This should include costs for labor, materials, paint, and the timeframe of the project. Covering details upfront will prevent issues from emerging later on. Ask the painter if they charge for travel time, whether their estimate includes pressure washing and caulking, and any other questions you might have.
1300 square foot house + single car garage. House on hill, 1/2 of house is 2 story, 1/2 1 story. South side of house needs LOTS OF PREP WORK! Paint peeling & flaking off. Want eves & facia white--stucco bottom white--wood siding blue grey--window trim white--and small accents, window sash, and single garage door antique white. (Sherwin Williams paint design colors). 1 base coat, 2 finish coats. Cost in CA.
1300 square foot house + single car garage. House on hill, 1/2 of house is 2 story, 1/2 1 story. South side of house needs LOTS OF PREP WORK! Paint peeling & flaking off. Want eves & facia white--stucco bottom white--wood siding blue grey--window trim white--and small accents, window sash, and single garage door antique white. (Sherwin Williams paint design colors). 1 base coat, 2 finish coats. Cost in CA.

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In addition, paint features such as mold and mildew resistance are important cost factors. Many mold-inhibiting bathroom paints, for instance, cost substantially more than ordinary latex-acrylic paint—sometimes close to twice the cost. Also, paints that come with warranties from the manufacturer may be more expensive depending on the length of the warranty. (A two-year warranty is standard.)
Paint can be expensive. Buying too much paint is particularly frustrating since paint stores won’t refund an already tinted gallon of paint. That’s why it’s recommended to first buy around 80% of the estimated paint you need and then purchase the remainder when you’re almost finished. Factors such as square footage, surface type, and quality of paint all play into how much paint you’ll need. Paint stores should be able to help you determine how much paint you need for a specific job. If you aren’t sure how much paint to buy, ask a salesperson for advice.
Expect to pay between $600 to $3,500 or $1.25 to $3 per square foot to coat vinyl, with prices likely increasing for the finish. It is one of the more inexpensive siding materials to have repainted, especially with recent innovations in materials. Changing the finish on your siding is not recommended unless it's completely degraded and worn away by the weather. You can save nearly half the vinyl siding installation cost of $4 per square foot by painting rather than replacing. Before adding a new coat to vinyl siding,
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