Your contractor will sweep or scrub the concrete first with a dry brush, and then clean it thoroughly with trisodium phosphate (TSP) and warm water, then let it dry. TSP is a mostly alkaline solution that does a great job cleaning grease and oil off concrete surfaces. Brush painting concrete siding costs $138 per 100 sq. ft., roll painting costs $50 per 100 sq. ft., and spray painting $32 per 100 sq. ft.


Plan the schedule. Get a grip on the time it will take to bring the project to fruition. Plan for time to move furniture, wall prep, cut in, the painting itself, eating and breaks, and don't forget cleanup and bringing furniture back in. As you plan, err on the side of prudence. Unforeseen events will slow you down, so allow time for these. Remember, this is a multi-day project. Don't try to fit too much into a day. If you move faster than planned, great!
1300 square foot house + single car garage. House on hill, 1/2 of house is 2 story, 1/2 1 story. South side of house needs LOTS OF PREP WORK! Paint peeling & flaking off. Want eves & facia white--stucco bottom white--wood siding blue grey--window trim white--and small accents, window sash, and single garage door antique white. (Sherwin Williams paint design colors). 1 base coat, 2 finish coats. Cost in CA.
It is helpful then to outline your wall with 2 or 3 inches of primer around the edges and frames before priming entirely the wall. Such a technique should help create a professional look by eliminating drips and splatters. A handheld brush is the best choice for this. For the actual primer application, roller paint can provide extra convenience. Spread the primer pain in V or W-shaped strokes. Once the primer has dried, sand down the bumps and wipe the walls down with a damp sponge.
Having a professional paint your home from top to bottom, inside and outside has a number of advantages. For one thing, it'll save you a ton of time by not having to do the work yourself. In addition, you won't have to be concerned about safety issues, such as climbing a ladder to paint your house's gutters. Best of all, you can expect a clean, attractive finished product from a professional painter.

Choose the best quality paint you can afford; it lasts longer. Experts estimate that the outside of a house should be painted every 5-7 years, but less-expensive paint may start peeling or fading in 4 years or less while really high-quality paint will hold up a bit longer. Better Homes & Gardens[1] describes and compares the different types of exterior paint while FastFacts.com[2] reviews specific brands.

The Cutters. Someone with meticulous attention to detail and a steady hand should be assigned the job of "cutting in," or painting a straight edge where needed, such as along a wall where the ceiling does not get painted. Many products are available to assist, but none work as well as a person who's good at doing it freehand. Ensure this person is skilled (ask them to show you). A poor, jagged, wavy or splotched cutting-in job will jump out at you every time you walk by it. Why more than one cutter? This job is nerve-wracking and painful to hands and arms after a few days. You'll want to give this person a break after a few walls.
After you have done the multiplication, subtract about 40 sq feet per window, and about 60 sq feet per door. Divide by 400 (interior paint covers 400 sq feet per gallon). The number that remains, is how many gallons you will need. If doing multiple wall colors, then you should do this process for each room (or sets of rooms) with a particular color. 
Repainting is key to maintaining exterior house paint. The material that your home is made of affects how often you should repaint. For instance, wood-paneled homes need to be repainted twice as often as those made of stucco. Environmental factors also play a role in how often you should repaint, since harsh climates can be hard on a home. As a general rule of thumb, homeowners should repaint their home every six to ten years.
You’ll spend between $500 and $3,000 or $1 to $3.50 per square foot to paint concrete. However, expect to pay $2 to $7 per square foot since concrete almost always needs a coat of primer first. Double that price if the concrete requires stripping. Concrete is porous. Sealing it not only helps blend foundations and walls with your home’s aesthetic, but also seals it against water. Repairing or resurfacing concrete costs $300 to $500 for every 100 square feet.
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