Rome came to our house to take a look around back in May and promised me a quote by the end of the day-unlike other workers that we've had in the past, Rome stuck by his word and had it to me via email by dinnertime....something that reinforced the initial positive feeling that I had about him as he surveyed our home and listened to my ideas. We hired Rome and he and his crew began working on our home within the following couple weeks. Something we love about Rome is how knowledgable he is when it comes to the range of paint products and colors (we had a general idea that we wanted a light neutral color with a little tint of green and the easiest way for me was to have Rome narrow it down to 2-3 colors), for whatever advice or guidance we needed, he was always (and is always) a phone call away!
On average, expect to pay $0.60–$1.60 per square foot for exterior painting. The average for painting labor across the country is $30–$40 per hour before you pay for paint, painting supplies, location costs, and equipment. To get a very general estimate, though, painting contractors will take into account the square footage of your home and the number of stories and also factor in normal prep work.
At least 90% of painting time goes into setup, prep work, and priming. The method of prepping required varies for each type of exterior material on the home, but every project must be patched and cleaned. The more thoroughly you prep and prime your home’s exterior, the longer your paint job will last. You could save quite a bit if you do this part yourself, but it must be done correctly, or your contractor will have to go over what you missed. The prices mentioned are based on paying a contractor to do each job rather than one overall quote for the work from start to finish.
Your contractor will sweep or scrub the concrete first with a dry brush, and then clean it thoroughly with trisodium phosphate (TSP) and warm water, then let it dry. TSP is a mostly alkaline solution that does a great job cleaning grease and oil off concrete surfaces. Brush painting concrete siding costs $138 per 100 sq. ft., roll painting costs $50 per 100 sq. ft., and spray painting $32 per 100 sq. ft.
Rome came to our house to take a look around back in May and promised me a quote by the end of the day-unlike other workers that we've had in the past, Rome stuck by his word and had it to me via email by dinnertime....something that reinforced the initial positive feeling that I had about him as he surveyed our home and listened to my ideas. We hired Rome and he and his crew began working on our home within the following couple weeks. Something we love about Rome is how knowledgable he is when it comes to the range of paint products and colors (we had a general idea that we wanted a light neutral color with a little tint of green and the easiest way for me was to have Rome narrow it down to 2-3 colors), for whatever advice or guidance we needed, he was always (and is always) a phone call away!
First, if you need it, we have it — all the paint for you home — every color you can imagine, in the finish you need, for every surface. Second, we’ can help narrow down your wall paint color choice until you decide on the right paint for your project. Of course, our paint associates at your local store can help pick our paint for your home. Pick up some paint swatches or order paint samples online so you can picture what it will look like. 

Plan the workforce. If you intend to not hire a professional crew, you'll need lots of help. There are many jobs to be done. First there's the furniture moving, then wall preparation, floor covering, materials gathering and prep, cleaning, and don't forget everyone will have to eat. It can easily take a team of five people a full ten days to paint a two-story (approx 2000 sq.ft.) home. Get as many people to help as you can. If some can only come one or two days, great. Maybe others can fill in. Ensure you plan with your workforce members in mind. They'll need plenty of time to arrange days away from work. Identify a few key personnel:


A more user-friendly option is a water-based “latex” paint, which blends acrylic pigments with a thin base for easy application with a brush or paint sprayer. Although many water-based interior paints are promoted as one-coat wonders, there can still be a need for an initial primer coat followed by one or two coats of latex paint. Water-based paints are very low in VOCs, which means minimal odors during the drying period. Most spills can be wiped away without the need for chemical cleaners, and clothing containing latex paint can be laundered in water and detergent. Water-based paint is a good choice for first-time DIYers and their younger assistants.
Paper drop cloths: $3 to $5 for 9x12-feet. Paper drop cloths provide a cheap way to cover furniture or windows while painting small, indoor jobs, such as touching up window trim. They're absorbent and textured to hold paint. When you're finished, you can just fold them up and throw them away. However, paper cloths are not the best option for protecting floors since they can tear easily.
Prep work should include removing all loose paint, either with a pressure washer or by scraping; removing any trace of mildew using bleach and water or a commercial solution, and sealing or covering dark stains; caulking all seams, corners and around windows or trim; applying epoxy filler to repair serious woodwork problems; covering dark stains; sanding all rough surfaces, and priming the bare wood with a bonding primer.

Following the same process as the primer, cut in the walls with your chosen paint. For best results, paint one wall at a time. This makes it easier to spread the paint while it’s still wet. Work from top to bottom, rolling the paint in V or W-shaped strokes. Before applying a second coat, wait two to four hours. Then proceed with the same process used for the first coat.

If the exterior of your home is unpainted or has been scraped and sanded, you will want to lay down a coat of primer. Make sure that the primer you’re using is right for the surface you’re painting. While most surfaces can be treated with acrylic primer, some surfaces, like cedar and redwood, require oil-based primers. The oil stops the wood tannins from bleeding through the topcoat.
House painting is no easy feat. While you may be tempted to purchase the cheapest kind of paint you can find, remember that you want the paint to look good and last a long time. If you haven’t chosen a color palette, there are a number of apartment design apps out there to spark inspiration. Once you’ve decided upon your color scheme, you’ll have to choose what kind of paint you want.
Painting is one of the quickest and easiest ways to give your home's interior a facelift with dramatic results. Fortunately, it doesn't have to be that difficult. Home improvement stores offer samples that you can take home. With these samples, you can try a few colors in large swaths on your wall to see the how the paint interacts with the room's natural light. Compare it against design elements like pillows or furniture to see whether it will work with your overall décor.
Basic labor to paint home with favorable site conditions. Prep up to 3 hr per 100 SF - clean, scrape, sand and patch up to 4 defects per 100 SF. Caulk gaps and spot prime. Roll / brush 2 coats of paint over lightly textured ceiling/walls. Paint up to 2 doors and door trim per room. Includes planning, equipment and material acquisition, area preparation and protection, setup and cleanup. 129 square feet $97.99 $132.56
Even if you hire a professional, you may need to play a small role in your house painting process. This could be anything from moving your furniture to the center of the room to removing switch plates and outlet covers. Ask your painter how much prep work is expected of you before hiring. The amount of work you’re willing to do could help you narrow down the right painter for the job.
For trim and doors, start with 1 gallon (3.8 L) of trim paint for every 600 sq feet of floor space. Purchase more at the store if/when needed. Trim is something that is difficult to calculate exactly, and it is more time-efficient to simply start with less than you need, and go buy more after you have used up the first round of paint and determined how much you will need to finish by seeing how much you have painted so far, compared to the gallons used.
Prepping a house costs anywhere from $0.50 to $2.50 per square foot. This is almost always included in the total project price. However, the DIYer might negotiate some discounts for completing this work on their own. Be warned, proper prep is key to the quality and durability of the finish. If you do this work yourself, the contractor might no guarantee to finished product.
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